CCPC Tackling Broad Range Of Consumer Harms

Author:Mr Niall Collins and Maureen O'Neill
Profession:Mason Hayes & Curran
 
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The Competition and Consumer Protection Commission ("CCPC") has a broad statutory remit to encourage competition and to promote and protect the interests and welfare of consumers. We examine the CCPC's dual mandate and its recent focus on tackling consumer harms.

Since its inception, the CCPC's mandate has revolved around two core goals: to make markets work better for both consumers and businesses. However, of late, there has been a noticeable focus on the consumer protection element of this mandate, including in competition cases.

The CCPC's competition law agenda in 2016 was concentrated on cartel detection and investigations into information sharing and anti-competitive agreements. It is clear that the detection and investigation of cartels and anti-competitive agreements will remain a top priority for the CCPC in 2017. For instance, the CCPC recently launched an investigation into alleged bid-rigging in school transport contracts. The CCPC's focus is on cases which have a real impact on consumers.

In 2016, an investigation was concluded into the publication of recommended minimum rates by the Approved Tour Guides of Ireland (ATGI). Similarly, an ongoing investigation is being conducted concerning information sharing by private motor insurers via a third party software product. The CCPC secured commitments in the ATGI case. These ensured tour guides set their prices individually so that consumers can shop around for the best prices. In the motor insurers case, the CCPC secured undertakings from the relevant insurance providers to address its concerns about consumer harm from reduced price competition, particularly where insurers were exchanging commercially sensitive information. The CCPC's investigation into price signalling in the motor insurance market remains on-going.

In 2015, the CCPC's consumer protection focus in competition cases was already being exhibited in commitments secured by the CCPC from Booking.com. This was on foot of a competition investigation into certain business practices of Booking.com. Among other things, the commitments required Booking.com to ensure that its customer contracts comply with applicable privacy and data protection laws. The intersection between privacy / data protection laws and competition law is a topic of much debate presently...

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