Editorial

Author:Maria Cahill
Pages:1-3
EDITORIAL
JUSTICE
FOR
OUR
TIMES?
SHAPING
LAW
FOR
A
CHANGING
WORLD
The
world
as
we
know
it
is
passing
away.
Humanity
stands resolutely
on
the
quicksand between
the
powerful
tides
of
ideas
and
inertias,
of
revolution
and
reticence,
of
aspiration
and
apathy.
We
cannot
now,
nor
could
we
ever,
refuse
to
acknowledge
the
gift
of
the
opportunity
we
are
given
to
make
a
choice
as
to which
wave
to
sail upon.
The
theme
of
Volume
Six
of
the
Trinity
College
Law
Review
has
been
chosen to
reflect
the
simple
truth
that
law
cannot
exist
in
a
societal
vacuum; that
it
can
neither
deny
nor
discount
the
world
in
which
it
operates.
While
it
is
clear
that
the
law
is,
in
Mary
Rogan's
words,
a
"powerful
social
tool"
and
serves
as
a
cohesive
force
in
society,
it
is
also
true
that
that
same
'society'
continually moulds
the
law
until each becomes
a
reflection
of
the
other.
In
her article,
Legitimacy
in
the
Criminal
Justice
System
of
Northern
Ireland,
Rogan
argues
that,
since
negative legitimacy
begets
negative legitimacy
and
positive
legitimacy
reinforces
positive
legitimacy,
the
solution
to
a
legitimacy
crisis
must
be
both
top-down
and
bottom-up
-
an
ongoing
dialogue
between
all
parties,
leading
to
reasoned,
balanced
and
just
solutions.
The
societal
forces
laying permanent
siege
to
the
mighty
Castle
of
Legal
Rules
come
in
the
form
of
many
disparate groupings:
politicians
with
local,
national
or transnational
mandates, lobby
groups with
a
plethora
of
special
interests, academics, scientists
and
other
'expert'
decision-making
bodies,
activist
(and
non-activist!)
members
of
the
judiciary
and,
occasionally,
the
assertive
student.
The
first
two
articles
in
the
journal
tackle
the
controversial subject
of
public
interest litigation.
A
New
Legal
Approach
to
Reducing
Social
Exclusion
by
Paul
O'Connell
and
Deirdre
Malone,
lambastes
the
'conservative' attitude
of
the Irish
judiciary
to
socio-economic rights
and
outlines
the
mindset
the
Public
Interest Lawyer
must
adopt
and the
role
he
or
she
must
play
in
future public interest
litigation. Meanwhile,
in
Opening
up
the
Courts
to
the
Marginalised,
Orla Ni
Chuilleandin
looks
at
the

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