Lynch -v- Minister for Justice Equality and Law Reform & Whelan -v- same, [2010] IESC 34 (2010)

Docket Number:15/08 & 18/09
Party Name:Lynch, Minister for Justice Equality and Law Reform & Whelan -v- same
Judge:Murray C.J.
 
FREE EXCERPT

UNAPPROVED

THE SUPREME COURT

15/08

18/09Murray C.J.

Denham J.

Hardiman J.

Geoghegan J.

Macken J.

BetweenPAUL LYNCH

Appellant-v-

THE MINISTER FOR JUSTICE, EQUALITY AND LAW REFORM, IRELAND AND THE ATTORNEY GENERAL RESPONDENTSAND BETWEEN

PETER WHELANAPPELLANT-v-

THE MINISTER FOR JUSTICE, EQUALITY AND LAW REFORM, IRELAND AND THE ATTORNEY GENERAL

JUDGMENT of the Court delivered by Murray C.J. on the 14th day of May 2010

These two cases were heard together as they raise the same issues concerning a challenge to the constitutionality of s. 2 of the Criminal Justice Act 1990 and a claim made pursuant to s. 5(1) of the European Convention on Human Rights Act 2003 for a declaration that 2 section is incompatible with the provisions of the Convention.

Section 2 of the Act of 1990 provides as follows:-"2.- A person convicted of treason or murder shall be sentenced to imprisonment for life."Each of the appellants stand convicted for the crime of murder and have been duly sentenced to life imprisonment pursuant to the aforesaid section.

Section 4 of the Criminal Justice Act 1964 provides:"4.- (1) Where a person kills another unlawfully the killing shall not be murder unless the accused person intended to kill, or cause serious injury, to some person, whether the person actually killed or not."On 2nd December 2002 Peter Whelan was convicted for the crime of murder at the Central Criminal Court and sentenced to life imprisonment pursuant to s. 2 of the Act of 1990.

On 10th February 1997 Paul Lynch was convicted for the crime of murder at the Central Criminal Court and also sentenced to life imprisonment for that offence.

The detention of the second appellant, Paul Lynch, was considered by the Parole Board in 2004, which has an advisory role only, and in July 2004 the first named defendant, the Minister, determined that the appellant should not be released from prison and that any further application in respect of his sentence would not be considered for a further period of three years.

As appears from s. 2 of the Act of 1990 a life sentence for the crime of murder is a mandatory sentence, leaving the courts no discretion but to impose it once a person is convicted of that crime. It is the mandatory nature of the sentence in all cases of murder that has given rise to the proceedings brought by each of the appellants.

History of punishment for murder in the State

For the purpose of addressing the issues raised in this case the Court considers it relevant to place the punishment imposed by the courts for the crime of murder in its legal and historical context.

At the foundation of the State in 1922 the crimes of murder, treason and piracy carried a mandatory death penalty. The duty of the courts to impose the mandatory death sentence upon any individual convicted of murder arose from sections 1 and 2 of the Offences Against The Person Act 1861.

That remained the position in law until the passing of the Criminal Justice Act 1964 which restricted the imposition of the death penalty to certain offences of murder which were categorized as capital murder in s. (1)(b) of the Act. Capital murder included, for example, murder of a member of An Garda Siochana or a prison officer acting in the course of his or her duty. Section (2) of the Act of 1964 provided for a mandatory life imprisonment for any person convicted of the crime of murder other than those designated as capitol murder in s. (1) of the Act. The 1861 Act was amended accordingly. It should be noted however that after the last such execution in 1956 the sentence of death was commuted to one of life imprisonment in every case.

In 1990 provision was made by law for the abolition of the death penalty for murder, and other offences. Section 1 of the Criminal Justice Act 1990 provided that no person should suffer death for any offence. As stated at the outset s. 2 of that Act makes provision for a mandatory life sentence for the offence of murder. Section 4 of the same Act requires the Court, when passing sentence in relation to certain types of murder, referred to in s. 3 of that Act, to specify that the minimum period of imprisonment to be served in such cases will not be less than 40 years. Again the types of murder referred to in the latter category include the murder of a member of the Garda Siochana or prison officer in the course of his or her duty.

The Constitution, although it did not provide for the imposition of the death penalty, implicitly recognized, until its amendment in 2001, that the death penalty could be imposed in certain cases. Article 13.6 of the Constitution vested in the President the right of pardon and the power to commute or remit punishment imposed by any court exercising criminal jurisdiction and also provided that such powers could also be conferred by law on other authorities "except in capital cases". Article 40.5 made special provision for the deferring of a death sentence where the Court had made an order pursuant to Article 40 for the production of the body of a person who was in detention and under sentence of death.

The Twenty First Amendment of the Constitution Act 2001 provided for the removal of all references to the death penalty in the Constitution and inserted in the Constitution Article 15.5.2 which now provides:"The Oireachtas shall not enact any law providing for the imposition of the death penalty".The position now is that, after the total abolition and prohibition of the imposition of the death penalty the minimum sentence which a court may impose on a person convicted of the crime of murder is life imprisonment.

Temporary Release

Every person serving a sentence for the commission of a crime, including those serving a life sentence, may be granted temporary release, subject to conditions. Section 2 of the Criminal Justice Act 1960, as amended by the Criminal Justice (Temporary Release of Prisoners) Act 2003 confers on the Minister the discretionary power to grant such temporary release and provides as follows:"2.(1) The Minister may direct that such person as is specified in the direction (being a person who is serving a sentence of imprisonment) shall be released from prison for such temporary period, and subject to such conditions, as may be specified in the direction or rules under this section applying to that person-

(a) for the purpose of-

(i) assessing the person's ability to reintegrate into society upon such release,

(ii) preparing him for release upon the expiration of his sentence of imprisonment, or upon his being discharged from prison before such expiration, or

(iii) assisting the Garda Síochána in the prevention, detection or investigation of offences, or the apprehension of a person guilty of an offence or suspected of having committed an offence,

(b) where there exist circumstances that, in the opinion of the Minister, justify his temporary release on-

(i) grounds of health, or

(ii) other humanitarian grounds,

(c) where, in the opinion of the Minister, it is necessary or expedient in order to-

(i) ensure the good government of the prison concerned, or

(ii) maintain good order in, and humane and just management of, the prison concerned, or

(d) where the Minister is of the opinion that the person has been rehabilitated and would, upon being released, be capable of reintegrating into society.

(2) The Minister shall, before giving a direction under this section, have regard to-

(a) the nature and gravity of the offence to which the sentence of imprisonment being served by the person relates.

(b) the sentence of imprisonment concerned and any recommendations of the court that imposed that sentence in relation thereto,

(c) the period of the sentence of imprisonment served by the person,

(d) the potential threat to the safety and security of members of the public (including the victim of the offence to which the sentence of imprisonment being served by the person relates) should the person be released from prison,

(e) any offence of which the person was convicted before being convicted of the offence to which the sentence of imprisonment being served by him relates,

(f) the risk of the person failing to return to prison upon the expiration of any period of temporary release,

(g) the conduct of the person while in custody, while previously the subject of a direction under this section, or during a period of temporary release to which rules under this section, made before the coming into operation of the Criminal Justice (Temporary Release of Prisoners) Act 2003, applied,

(h) any report of, or recommendation made by-

(i) the governor of, or person for the time being performing the functions of governor in relation to, the prison concerned,

(ii) the Garda Síochána,

(iii) a probation and welfare officer, or

(iv) any other person whom the Minister considers would be of assistance in enabling him to make a decision as to whether to give a direction under subsection (1) that relates to the person concerned.

(i) the risk of the person committing an offence during any period of temporary release,

(j) the risk of the person failing to comply with any conditions attaching to his temporary release, and

(k) the likelihood that any period of temporary release might accelerate the person's reintegration into society or improve his prospects of obtaining employment.

(3) The Minister shall not give a direction under this section in respect of a person-

(a) if he is of the opinion that, for reasons connected with any one or more of the matters referred to in subsection (2), it would not be appropriate to so do,

………… ."Summary of the arguments of the parties on the constitutional issue

The Appellants

For the purpose of placing the imposition of a life sentence in its factual context it was pointed out in the course of their submissions that once a jury had returned a verdict of guilty of murder the trial judge had no further judicial discretion in the matter and was required to impose the life sentence as laid down by the...

To continue reading

REQUEST YOUR TRIAL