What Are The Rights Of Agency Workers From Monday, 5 December 2011?

Author:Ms Melanie Crowley
Profession:Mason Hayes & Curran
 
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The deadline for the transposition (by putting domestic legislation in place) of the EU Directive on Temporary Agency Work (Directive 2008/104/EC) (the Directive) is Monday 5 December 2011. The main aim of the Directive is to ensure equal treatment in relation to basic working and employment conditions1 between temporary agency workers and workers employed directly by the organisation where the agency worker is placed (the end user). So what happens on Monday 5 December 2011? As of today's date (2 December 2011), the Irish government has not yet published transposing legislation. This is not all that unusual and indeed it was the case with the fixed term workers legislation. It does, however, mean that the State may be subject to potential infringement proceedings leading to financial penalties for late implementation. Of more immediate concern, however, is the fact that agency workers in the public sector may be in a position to rely directly on the provisions of the Directive to enforce certain rights against their employers from Monday 5 December.  Contrary to what has been reported in the media, in order to benefit from the Directive, employees in the public sector would have to assert their rights under the Directive before a third party, such as a court or tribunal, and it remains to be seen if the provisions will be held to have direct effect. It has been reported widely that the provisions of the Directive can also be relied on by agency workers in the private sector. In the absence of the transposing legislation, this is not the case.  Derogations The Directive allows for a number of derogations or exceptions in relation to the protections provided to agency workers, including the setting of a qualifying period for equal treatment. In the U.K., the right to equal treatment does not kick in until the agency worker has been engaged by the end...

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